Psychosocial Burden Of Acne

Psychosocial Burden Of Acne

                                                            Psychosocial Burden of Acne

Acne is one of the common skin problems affecting about 80% of the youth and causing significant psychosocial burden it can affect mood and interpersonal relationship.

Due to acne issues such as discontentment with one’s own appearance, self-consciousness, embarrassment, losing self-confidence, low self-esteem, avoiding social interaction with peers and the opposite sex, and reduce opportunities for employment have also been reported. Acne can even lead to permanent behavioral changes, causing the individuals to avoid social interaction and situation in later phases of life.

A study even reports that anxiety due to acne can negatively influence an individual intention to participate in sports or exercise. The presence of acne was found to be associated with poor self-attitude in boys and poor self-worth in girls.

Evidence from several review reports suggested a direct relationship between the severity of acne and depression and anxiety. Acne was also found to be associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts. The incidence of Suicidal ideation and depression in patients with severe acne was the highest among patients with various dermatoses, while in patients with mild and moderate acne, it was comparable to patients with skin disease such as atopic dermatitis, alopecia areata, and psoriasis.

The psychological, social, and emotional burden due to acne is equivalent to that caused by epilepsy, diabetes, asthma, and arthritis.

Emotional distress and anxiety due to acne can further aggravate the condition. The social and psychological consequence is also enormous, despite acne not being a life-threatening condition. Therefore, reducing the psychosocial burden of acne can be one of the management strategies.

 

Ayurvedic perspective on skin health

Ayurvedic perspective on skin health

Any ‘’diet’’ that fails to provide nutritional benefits or predisposes an individual to any type of disease condition is termed as an ‘’unhealthy diet’’.

An unhealthy diet encompasses incompatible diet and dietary mannerism. According to ancient Ayurvedic literature, incompatible diet ( Viruddha Ahara ) is defined as the food constituents in any preparation that are consumed in a wrong combination, are under processed or overprocessed, are not consumed in proper quantities, or are consumed at an incorrect period/hour of the day or in the wrong season.

Certain healthy foods when combined and consumed might be incompatible and cause severe disease condition including skin diseased in charak Samhita and ancient Ayurvedic literature, it is stated that milk should be avoided along with a diet that includes all sour foods such as fermented food item (Eg. Idli and dhokla) fruits ( example Amla and pineapple and pomegranate) curd, buttermilk, and fish.

Diet practices have evolved with time however, the basic principle followed in the in olden days hold Good even today.

 

Dental And Oral Health: Through Ayurveda

Dental And Oral Health: Through Ayurveda

                        Dental And Oral Health: Through Ayurveda

In Ayurveda dental health ( Danta Swasthya ) is discussed under shalakyatantra ( Mukhaaroga ) . Dental health is known to be characteristic and differs based on an individual’s constitution( Prakriti ) . As per shalakyatantra, 65 different types of oral disease can originate in defferent anatomical location: 8 are related to teeth , 5 to tounge , 8 to lips , 9 to palate , 15 to alveolar margin and 17 to oropharynx , 3 occur in generalized form . Ayurveda perceives a link between oral health and overall health .

Proper oral care ensures that the teeth and gums remain intact, while promoting overall health and well being. Good oral health enhance the sense of taste , support detoxification of oral tissues , promotes optimal digestive strength , and boosts immunity . Dental health is directly correlated with bone health, as teeth are considered to be the by product of osseous tissue .In addition to the direct factors , such as exposure to excess sugar, acidic foods, cold foods and water, which affect dental health , lack of proper nutrition , overall health status and stress levels can also influence dental health.

Ayurveda recommends certain oral hygiene practices such as using herbals brushes ( Chewing herbal branches) obtained from the fresh stem of plants ( such as Nimba , Yastimadhu, Babul, Jatiphalam and Arjuna) these should be either astringent ( kashaya ) , acidic ( Katu ) or bitter ( Tikta) , swishing certain oils( like eremedadi oil ) in the mouthThis technique helps strengthen and maintain healthy teeth, strengthen the jawsand improve taste perception . the medicated  and scraping the tongue. Current research shows that herbal twigs of plants the have been described in ayurvedic text have medicinal and anticariogenic properties .

All these aforementioned practices help reduce or prevent dental issues such as tooth sensitivity  , cavities , pyorrhoea, gingivitis , stamatitis and bleeding gums . herb such as Tulsi , Tvak and Lavanga have been used in treating several common dental problems

Menopause: Ayurvedic Perspective

Menopause: Ayurvedic Perspective

                      Menopause: Ayurvedic Perspective

Menopause is a normal phase of a women natural aging process and occurs as hormone levels in the body decline In Ayurveda menopause called rajonivritti where raja means menstrual discharge and nivritti means completion.R ajonivritti is the transitional phase in a woman’s life span during which the woman enters from the reproductive to nonreproductive phase. Ayurveda considers this as a natural phenomenon ( Swabhawaja ). The fourth to fifth decade of life, which is described as the age of physiologic menopause in women, is known as a praudhawastha in ayurvedic literature. it is the age of physiologic  ( swabhawika ) dominance of Vata dosha, a decline in Kapha dosha, and dhatu kshaya, a process that involves reduction of body tissue.

The various symptoms of menopausal syndrome namely hot flashes, palpitation, anxiety, irritability, depression, reduced memory, insomnia, recurrent urinary tract and veginal infection, constipation, dysuria, dyspareunia may be attributed to the imbalance in doshas, and the process of dhatu kshaya in the body. Artava Kashaya ( ovarian follicular atresia ) is also a part of the process of dhatu kashaya in the body. other predisposing and precipitating factors such as Vata and Pitta Predominant Prakriti, mithya ahara vihara, monsik doshas, and stress further accelerate this condition leading to various distressing symptoms.

Ayurveda emphasizes that Rasayana therapy has a significate role to play in the management of condition associated with menopause .many ayurvedic herbs useful in a menopausal phase like Ashoka , Brahmi, Shatavari, yastimadhu etc.

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